Cast Of Each Comic

Monday, September 30, 2013

Women's Fashion Part 3

Evening Dress, House of Wort

The cherry iconography is pleasing and cheerful. The masterful way the fabrics is joined creates various formations of cherry bunches which is especially effective at the back. This would have been a very expensive textile as the motifs are printed on the warp threads before being woven, which creates a blurry effect. Interestingly this is a fanciful rendition of the cherry branch since cherry trees do not have both blossoms and fruit at the same time.

c. 1898, French
Jean-Philippe Worth began as an assistant to his father, Charles Frederick Worth, in 1875. Gradually he was allowed to create his own designs and when his father died in 1895, he became the lead designer for the house. He was praised for making elaborate artistic gowns with intricate trimmings on unique textiles, much like his father had before him. Although the House of Worth was still favored by royalty and celebrities through the turn of the century, their styles were no longer the forefront of French fashion after 1900. Around 1910 Jean-Philippe limited his design work to important orders and hired his nephew, Jean-Charles Worth, as the new lead designer before leaving the company entirely after World War I.

















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Afternoon Dress, House of Worth

The bustle silhouette, although primarily associated with the second half of the 19th century, originated in earlier fashions as a simple bump at the back of the dress, such as with late 17th-early 18th century mantuas and late 18th- early 19th century Empire dresses. The full-blown bustle silhouette had its first Victorian appearance in the late 1860s, which started as fullness in skirts moving to the back of the dress. This fullness was drawn up in ties for walking that created a fashionable puff. This trendsetting puff expanded and was then built up with supports from a variety of different things such as horsehair, metal hoops and down. Styles of this period were often taken from historical inspiration and covered in various types of trim and lace. Accessories were petite and allowed for the focus on the large elaborate gowns. Around 1874, the style altered and the skirts began to hug the thighs in the front while the bustle at the back was reduced to a natural flow from the waist to the train. This period was marked by darker colors, asymmetrical drapery, oversize accessories and elongated forms created by full-length coats. Near the beginning of the 1880s the trends altered once again to include the bustle, this time it would reach its maximum potential with some skirts having the appearance of a full shelf at the back. The dense textiles preferred were covered in trimming, beadwork, puffs and bows to visually elevate them further. The feminine silhouette continued like this through 1889 before the skirts began to reduce and make way for the S-curve silhouette.

c. 1875, French











































Charles Frederick Worth was born in England and spent his young adulthood working for textile merchants in London while researching art history at museums. In 1845 he moved to Paris and worked as a salesman and a dressmaker before partnering with Otto Bobergh to open the dressmaking shop, Worth and Bobergh, in 1858. They were soon recognized by royalty and major success followed. In 1870 Worth became the sole proprietor of the business. At his shop, Worth fashioned completed creations which he then showed to clients on live models. Clients could then order their favorites according to their own specifications. This method is the origin of haute couture. Worth designed gowns which were works of art that implemented a perfect play of colors and textures created by meticulously chosen textiles and trims. The sheer volume of the textiles he employed on each dress is testimony to his respect and support of the textile industry. Worth's creative output maintained its standard and popularity throughout his life. The business continued under the direction of his sons, grandsons and great-grandsons through the first half of the twentieth century.


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Evening Dress, House of Paquin

c. 1905-1907, French
Produced several years prior to the 1908 Hellenic designs of Paul Poiret, the raised waist and decorative references to Greek antiquity indicate this classical aesthetic and change of silhouette were in the air from 1905 on. As the leading house of couture druing the Belle Epoque, Paquin's promotion of this line would have been widely known to the public. The dress also incorporates signature decorative techniques such as velvet piping outlining peach satin ribbon at neckline and waist and the contrasting tones and reflections of silver, satin and velvet.



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Women's Fashion Part 4 will be coming soon!

Come back for Page 9 tomorrow night to see the new page!

Women's Fashion Part 2

Ball Gown

c. 1842

British

This is a striking example of how 18th-century fabric was treasured. The textile was probably originally a 1740s dress which was taken apart and then reconfigured into this fashionable dress in the early 1840s. The elongated waist and V-shaped bodice front emphasize the bust and wide shoulders and were key features of the dresses of the period.

The female silhouette of the middle of the 19th century consisted of a fitted corseted bodice and wide full skirts. The conical skirts developed between the 1830s, when the high waist of the Empire silhouette was lowered and the skirts became more bell shaped, to the late 1860s, when the fullness of the skirts were pulled to the back and the bustle developed. The flared skirts of the period gradually increased in size throughout and were supported by a number of methods. Originally support came from multiple layers of petticoats which, due to weight and discomfort, were supplanted by underskirts comprised of graduated hoops made from materials such as baleen, cane and metal. The fashions during this time allowed the textiles to stand out because of the vast surface areas of the skirt and a relatively minimal amount of excess trim.



































































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Afternoon Dress
c. 1865, American
The influence that military uniforms played on women's dress during the years of the Civil War is evident here. Women reflected their patriotism readily in their mode of dress to help encourage the soldiers on to victory. The bands ending in rosettes on the skirt are reminiscent of swags and decorations at military ceremonies while the shoulder and sleeve decorations are taken from stripes and epaulets on military jackets. 

The female silhouette of the middle of the 19th century consisted of a fitted corseted bodice and wide full skirts. The conical skirts developed between the 1830s, when the high waist of the Empire silhouette was lowered and the skirts became more bell shaped, to the late 1860s, when the fullness of the skirts were pulled to the back and the bustle developed. The flared skirts of the period gradually increased in size throughout and were supported by a number of methods. Originally support came from multiple layers of petticoats which, due to weight and discomfort, were supplanted by underskirts comprised of graduated hoops made from materials such as baleen, cane and metal. The fashions during this time allowed the textiles to stand out because of the vast surface areas of the skirt and a relatively minimal amount of excess trim.


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Evening Dress, House of Worth

c. 1894, French

Charles Frederick Worth was born in England and spent his young adulthood working for textile merchants in London while researching art history at museums. In 1845 he moved to Paris and worked as a salesman and a dressmaker before partnering with Otto Bobergh to open the dressmaking shop, Worth and Bobergh, in 1858. They were soon recognized by royalty and major success followed. In 1870 Worth became the sole proprietor of the business. At his shop, Worth fashioned completed creations which he then showed to clients on live models. Clients could then order their favorites according to their own specifications. This method is the origin of haute couture. Worth designed gowns which were works of art that implemented a perfect play of colors and textures created by meticulously chosen textiles and trims. The sheer volume of the textiles he employed on each dress is testimony to his respect and support of the textile industry. Worth's creative output maintained its standard and popularity throughout his life. The business continued under the direction of his sons, grandsons and great-grandsons through the first half of the twentieth century.

Jean-Philippe Worth began as an assistant to his father, Charles Frederick Worth, in 1875. Gradually he was allowed to create his own designs and when his father died in 1895, he became the lead designer for the house. He was praised for making elaborate artistic gowns with intricate trimmings on unique textiles, much like his father had before him. Although the House of Worth was still favored by royalty and celebrities through the turn of the century, their styles were no longer the forefront of French fashion after 1900. Around 1910 Jean-Philippe limited his design work to important orders and hired his nephew, Jean-Charles Worth, as the new lead designer before leaving the company entirely after World War I.




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Stay tune for Part 3 of Women's Fashion!

Sunday, September 29, 2013

NEWS UPDATES

Halloween is coming real fast soon!  It looks like I'll be doing the comic strip.  And so, the Halloween update will be on Wednesday of that week of Halloween.

I've been apart away from the bio for a while.  I need to work on it as soon as I can.  I got some of it wrote down already and need to get right on it this week.

Issue 2:
So far, that we are getting to the end of it with pages 7 & 8 added.  So here's the recap of what has been happen in Issue 2:

On Page 1-Howe got the news and he thinks it's the Headless Horseman that killed those women.

Page 2-Howe still thinks it's still is the Horseman.

On Page 3-you can see the Horseman in the last panel with Howe in front of it in his dream.

Page 4-It's coming back.

Page 5-Howe is getting ready to tell Clinton about those dreams of his and the Horseman killing the three women.

Page 6-Clinton tells Howe to write a letter to his family.

Page 7-An officer tells Clinton the news about the three women killed and their heads were cut off and missing.

And Page 8-Clinton tells the officer to make sure that Howe is asleep.  And going onto the next scene with Howe looking at the flowers.
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That is how far of what happen so far in Issue 2.  Pages 9 & 10 will be relaxing and away from Clinton.  Clinton is all about trying to out ranked an higher officers like General William Howe or Thomas Gage.

Well, that's all I have for now.  Please enjoy the previews of Pages 9 & 10!
Preview of Page 9
Preview of Page 10

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Page 8: He Was Trying To Tell You


Clinton is at it again.  Well, that the end of Clinton for this week and that the end of him for Issue 2 til Issue 4.

The flowers looks great in the last panel for General Howe to buy some instead of resting.  Find out on Wednesday to find out more on page 9 and stay tune on Monday for NEWS UPDATE for more info and other news!

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Past Fashions I And More On General Henry Clinton

I don't know the year for this but I'm thinking between 1890 to 1900.
1760
1780
1805
1830-35
1855
1875
1907
1910
1920
I got some of these dresses from Bunka Gakuen Costume Museum. The link is: Bunka Gakuen Costume Museum, just clink on the colored link, it will take you there, and it is from Japan, the museum.

Don't forget to stay tune for the next page update on Friday for page 8!

And Clinton is not behind all this and not the bad guy but a busy one.  And Clinton is not a main character, but he would have to be one if he wants to be one.  Clinton will be leaving us at the end of Act 2 or start of Act 3 but not sure why he's leaving.  Don't worry, I won't let him die and trying to keep the real facts in this story just like with Howe, he'll be going back home by the end of the final Act of Sleepy Hollow.  I can't say more til we get there.

Clinton is one of those characters that don't get to see much.  And besides that he is very rude in Issue 2 already.

Clinton will come back once he takes Howe's place in command but right now he is 3rd in-command.

I don't think I have anything more to say about the "old rude busy" Clinton right now.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Page 7: It Better Be Good

Clinton sure do have a problem with dreams.
Well, page 7 is added and things gets worse for Howe, with Clinton sounding like he's screaming him and telling to shut up.

What's up with Clinton, lately? . . .

Do you guys think that Clinton is behind all of this or not? . . .

Please comment below of what are your thoughts are. . . .

Stay tune for page 8 on Friday!

Sunday, September 22, 2013

NEWS UPDATE: General Howe & Clinton Drama

Is General Clinton got to believe Howe's dreams yet? . . . No!  Not til he sees it in front of his own eyes.  In this week NEWS UPDATE, I'll talk more of what's ahead in Issue 2 and my progress with issue 4 and with Halloween on it's way.

From Page 1
Issue 2
Well, we just found out on page 5 with Clinton telling Howe to write to his family and Howe thinks Clinton is crazy.  And more of that ends up on page 6.

Clinton, you can't just tell him to write if he don't want to!
You will find out more on this week update on pages 7 and 8.  Issue 2 is only 15 pages long but it's flying by fast.  Evil Howe will appear through out of Act I as a cameo character til Issue 5 and will become one of the main characters on Issue 6 in which it's almost to the end of Act I.

Evil Howe from Issue 4.  Looks scary. . .

My Progress On Issue 4
While I was working on some pages, I came across Evil Howe again, it's like he comes out of  nowhere but I also did say that he will appear as a cameo.  Issue 4 will have Lt. Bryan Johnson and more of Clinton's plots over Howe's rank and Clinton is becoming more of a little bit meaner and will get in Howe's way.

Fight it, General Howe, I know you can do it. . . .
Halloween
Halloween is one of those days you can think of the Headless Horseman. . . .

I was just thinking that it will be a Halloween Comic Strip of the characters from the comic instead of a page update.  What do you guys think?  And I'll even add The Headless Horseman with the gang to to make it look scary.

General Howe, it's the Headless Horseman.
Well, I think that's all of it til the next week NEWS UPDATE.  Til then, here's previews of this weeks' page update for Wed. & Fri..

Page 7 preview
Page 8 preview

Page 6: Why Can't You Just Listen!

That won't help, Clinton!

I'm sorry about the late update.  It all started with playing a brand new video game and it makes you lose side track with other things.  It won't happen again this time.  And so, it's Sunday, and page 6 is here.  Come back later on tonight for "NEWS UPDATE" for some more news.  And page updates are still on Wednesdays and Fridays while NEWS UPDATES are on Mondays!

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Page 5: You Should Talk To A Family Member


I misspelled member, Clinton,  it won't happen again!
You can see that I spelled "member" wrong.

It won't happen again, I will use spell check now on.  Well, Clinton looks mad in this panel above.  We'll find out be reading page 5.

Stay tune for page 6 on Friday for more drama between Howe and Clinton!

Monday, September 16, 2013

Women's Fashion Part 1

Dress
c. 1760

Monochrome, but in a bright canary yellow guaranteed to catch anyone's attention across a room, this exceptionally well-preserved robe à la française with trimmings represents the apogee of the form. The absence of ornament, other than basic ruffles, makes this a museum object easy to read: it is a perfect teaching example, free from distractions and affirming thereby the adorned beauty of eighteenth-century silhouette and style, so often masked under frills and coquetry.




Robe à la Française

1740's

A perfect example of the robe à la française at mid-century, this hand-painted silk dress displays the opulence, Orientalism, and insatiable baroque excess of the time. Layers build on layers; flowers terrace out from the two-dimensional on the textile, to silk flowers, to nets laden with trapped flowers and floss. The silhouette is perfectly of the era: panniers dilate the hips; a narrow waist is achieved by the corset, which further pushes up and supports the bust. A deep décolletage is rendered more or less modest with insertions of bits of cloth, and the sleeves are finished with layers of engageants that are generally just basted in for easy detachment and washing and are thereby useful in keeping the valued dress clean.


Robe à l'Anglaise

c. 1785-1787

In eighteenth-century dress, the torso was encased by layers of quilted linen and boning that constitute an exaggerated exoskeleton. An inevitable consequence of this redefinition of the torso is an emphasis on the hip and bustline. By mid-century, especially in France, the style was for the bust, veiled by lace or a sheer mull fichu, to emerge above the top line of the bodice.



Court Dress


c. 1750

In the eighteenth century, formal dress was so closely associated with Versailles and the French court that it was universally described as the robe à la française. The robe à la françaisehas a fitted overdress which is open at the frontand has a decorative bodice insert called a stomacher covering the corset and an underskirt, the petticoat, showing under the splayed drapery of the overskirt. 

In its most formal configuration, the robe à la française presented a particularly wide and flattened profile accomplished by enlarged panniers. Constructed of supple bent wands of willow or whalebone and covered in linen, panniers took on broader or narrower silhouettes. The most remarkable held out the skirts like sandwich boards, barely wider than the body in side view but as expansive as possible in front or rear view. A woman so garbed had to pass through a door sideways.





Robe à la Française

c.1750-1775

Growing out of the fantastical atmosphere of the eighteenth–century French aristocratic milieu, and conceived as often by ennui as by personal vanity, the fashions embodied by the ever-formalrobe à la française were the product of an age that sought at any cost to convey extreme grace and aesthetic perfection. This piece is imbued with the luxury and ostentation inherent in the era's metallic embroidered silks and serpentine floral textile patterns. The playfulness of the delicate hand-painted silk taffeta sufficiently showcases the Watteau (after the eponymous artist), or sacque back of the robe, reinterpreted from the seventeenth–century gown to incorporate two expansive pleats from the neckline at back. Though this piece does not demonstrate the extremity of the eighteenth–century silhouette as required by French Court dress, it clearly champions panniers to support the gown and a tightly corseted bodice.



Dress
c. 1882

The late nineteenth century in fashion is governed by both the somewhat typical constructions of lace and silk eveningwear, and the fairly new and "modern" representations of women's sport and travel clothing. While most intriguing are the avant-garde developments of the Bloomer pants and the many adaptations of the women's riding habit, which incorporated menswear affectations into both its ornamentation and its construction, the women's walking costume is one of the most difficult ensembles to find currently in pristine condition. Partially because few women felt compelled to include such a pedestrian costume in their trousseaus, and partially due to the natural deteriorations caused by light, moisture and old age, the well-kempt walking costume of the 1880s and 1890s can be found in few modern costume collections. The construction of the ensemble's bustle is squarely in congruence with the trendy shape of the second bustle period, and the Curaisse-shaped infra-structure and tightly rounded sleeve are unequivocal documentations of this period in fashion.

This is the only view of the dress they only have








Dress

c. 1872

The 1870s was a period of marked romanticism and whimsy in fashionable dress. Much like the picturesque paintings of Renoir that depict such confectionary creations, both day and evening gowns were highly ornamented and often executed in delicate, feminine textiles. Though eveningwear was marked by décolleté necklines and lavish silk satins and taffetas, day dresses were made more modest with austere fabrics like cotton or wool. While many women owned walking and traveling dresses which afforded slightly greater moveability, also quite common was the summer day dress that was to be worn to an afternoon tea or reception. 

This garment, emblematic of warm weather day dresses of the period with its sheer printed cotton and delicate lace trim, is a particularly pristine example, and notable for its clear revival of eighteenth–century aesthetic sensibilites. The late nineteenth century, abetted by the luxury and progress of the Industrial Age, recalled distinctly, both in its textiles and in the etiquette that surrounded fashionable dress, the notorious material excesses of the third quarter of the eighteenth century. The wealthy classes of the late–nineteenth–century showed a particular respect for the formalities of fashion. While their garments were not nearly as ornamental and their entertaining circles not as elitist, the decorative effects of late nineteenth century afternoon reception dresses such as this one unarguably echoed the lavishness of the eighteenth–century gown, most notably here in the sleeve and neckline.


That's the end of Part 1.

Stay tune for Part 2.