Monday, September 30, 2013

Women's Fashion Part 3

Evening Dress, House of Wort

The cherry iconography is pleasing and cheerful. The masterful way the fabrics is joined creates various formations of cherry bunches which is especially effective at the back. This would have been a very expensive textile as the motifs are printed on the warp threads before being woven, which creates a blurry effect. Interestingly this is a fanciful rendition of the cherry branch since cherry trees do not have both blossoms and fruit at the same time.

c. 1898, French
Jean-Philippe Worth began as an assistant to his father, Charles Frederick Worth, in 1875. Gradually he was allowed to create his own designs and when his father died in 1895, he became the lead designer for the house. He was praised for making elaborate artistic gowns with intricate trimmings on unique textiles, much like his father had before him. Although the House of Worth was still favored by royalty and celebrities through the turn of the century, their styles were no longer the forefront of French fashion after 1900. Around 1910 Jean-Philippe limited his design work to important orders and hired his nephew, Jean-Charles Worth, as the new lead designer before leaving the company entirely after World War I.

















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Afternoon Dress, House of Worth

The bustle silhouette, although primarily associated with the second half of the 19th century, originated in earlier fashions as a simple bump at the back of the dress, such as with late 17th-early 18th century mantuas and late 18th- early 19th century Empire dresses. The full-blown bustle silhouette had its first Victorian appearance in the late 1860s, which started as fullness in skirts moving to the back of the dress. This fullness was drawn up in ties for walking that created a fashionable puff. This trendsetting puff expanded and was then built up with supports from a variety of different things such as horsehair, metal hoops and down. Styles of this period were often taken from historical inspiration and covered in various types of trim and lace. Accessories were petite and allowed for the focus on the large elaborate gowns. Around 1874, the style altered and the skirts began to hug the thighs in the front while the bustle at the back was reduced to a natural flow from the waist to the train. This period was marked by darker colors, asymmetrical drapery, oversize accessories and elongated forms created by full-length coats. Near the beginning of the 1880s the trends altered once again to include the bustle, this time it would reach its maximum potential with some skirts having the appearance of a full shelf at the back. The dense textiles preferred were covered in trimming, beadwork, puffs and bows to visually elevate them further. The feminine silhouette continued like this through 1889 before the skirts began to reduce and make way for the S-curve silhouette.

c. 1875, French











































Charles Frederick Worth was born in England and spent his young adulthood working for textile merchants in London while researching art history at museums. In 1845 he moved to Paris and worked as a salesman and a dressmaker before partnering with Otto Bobergh to open the dressmaking shop, Worth and Bobergh, in 1858. They were soon recognized by royalty and major success followed. In 1870 Worth became the sole proprietor of the business. At his shop, Worth fashioned completed creations which he then showed to clients on live models. Clients could then order their favorites according to their own specifications. This method is the origin of haute couture. Worth designed gowns which were works of art that implemented a perfect play of colors and textures created by meticulously chosen textiles and trims. The sheer volume of the textiles he employed on each dress is testimony to his respect and support of the textile industry. Worth's creative output maintained its standard and popularity throughout his life. The business continued under the direction of his sons, grandsons and great-grandsons through the first half of the twentieth century.


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Evening Dress, House of Paquin

c. 1905-1907, French
Produced several years prior to the 1908 Hellenic designs of Paul Poiret, the raised waist and decorative references to Greek antiquity indicate this classical aesthetic and change of silhouette were in the air from 1905 on. As the leading house of couture druing the Belle Epoque, Paquin's promotion of this line would have been widely known to the public. The dress also incorporates signature decorative techniques such as velvet piping outlining peach satin ribbon at neckline and waist and the contrasting tones and reflections of silver, satin and velvet.



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Women's Fashion Part 4 will be coming soon!

Come back for Page 9 tomorrow night to see the new page!

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